Canon 18×50 Image Stabilization All-Weather Binoculars w/Case, Neck Strap & Batteries

December 3, 2015 - Comment

High-Power, Large Binoculars Perfect for Star Gazing or When You Can’t Get Close Enough. (Featuring an Image Stabilizer and All-Weather design.) With its wide 50mm objective lenses and high magnification, these rugged, all-weather Canon Image Stabilizer Binoculars are destined to set a new and higher benchmark for image brightness, clarity and ergonomic design. FEATURES: Built-in

Buy Now! $1,399.99Amazon.com Price
(as of September 19, 2017 2:18 am EDT - Details)

High-Power, Large Binoculars Perfect for Star Gazing or When You Can’t Get Close Enough. (Featuring an Image Stabilizer and All-Weather design.) With its wide 50mm objective lenses and high magnification, these rugged, all-weather Canon Image Stabilizer Binoculars are destined to set a new and higher benchmark for image brightness, clarity and ergonomic design.

FEATURES: Built-in Image Stabilizer (IS) provides shake-free performance High magnification ratio: 18X Ultra-low dispersion (UD) glass elements for exceptional image quality Doublet field-flattener for sharp, distortion-free images from edge-to-edge Extra-bright, large diameter 50mm objective lens Long eye relief: 15mm Water-resistant construction with non-slip rubberized grip Canon’s 18×50 IS binoculars incorporate an optical image stabilizer for shake-free viewing and minimal eye fatigue. This technology was first developed for Canon video camcorders and is now available in many of Canon’s binoculars. The system employs a Vari-Angle Prism, dual transparent plates, independent vertical and horizontal sensors, and a dedicated microprocessor to continuously adjust the prism to maintain a steady image.

The 18×50 IS binoculars feature a water-resistant, shock-resistant rubber coating for a nonslip grip and better durability. If you get caught in the rain and still want to view, you don’t have to worry about the optics fogging up. These binoculars deliver high magnification and wide-field viewing. Controls for focusing and image stabilization are centrally located and accessible by both hands. These binoculars provide long eye relief for extra comfort.

Image Stabilization and More
With any high magnification binoculars, most users will experience frustrating image shake. Unless fixed to a tripod, image shake can render high magnification binoculars useless. Canon’s IS technology is remarkably effective at eliminating this problem and is widely used by the television industry with Canon’s professional broadcast quality video recording equipment. A special VAP (Vari-Angle Prism) corrective IS system sits between the objective lens group and the porro prism on each side of the binoculars. Within thousandths of a second of the binoculars being moved from their optical axis by vibrations, a detection system activates the IS mechanism. The VAP shape alters to refract or ‘bend’ the light path by precisely the right amount, thus fully compensating for the vibration. It is this essentially immediate response that effectively suppresses image shake.

Super Spectra Coating
A number of optical factors affect the brightness of an image, including the amount of incidental light that is reflected by the lens. An uncoated lens will refelect away as much as 8% of the incidentail light, significantly dimming the image. Canon’s Super Spectra Coating prevents that reflection.

What do the numbers mean?
15×50? 8×25? The two numbers used to describe any pair of binoculars are their magnification — 8x, 12x, 15x and so on — and the diameter of their objective lenses — 25mm, 36mm, 50mm, and so on. The larger the first number is, the larger the object will appear to be in the objective lens. For instance, if you use a 10x lens and look at an object that is 100 yards away, it appears to be the same size as an object located just 10 yards away. The second number, the size of the objective lens, is important because the larger the objective lens, the more light it can admit for brighter, more detailed images, and the better suited they will be for lowlight situations.

A look inside

Product Features

  • 18x magnification
  • Built-in optical image stabilization uses 2 AA batteries
  • Wide, extra-bright field of view
  • Lenses are multi-coated for contrast, clarity, and color fidelity
  • Shock and water-resistant

Comments

Amazon Customer says:

Great but has some design flaws costing another $350 in repair Right out of the box, these binoculars, no doubt are one of the best pair of optics I have ever purchased. The Image Stabilization feature is what makes the bincoluars so attractive…and expensive. 

petehhh says:

Just one thing to add Actually two things. First, these are incredible. If you haven’t tried IS binoculars, run don’t walk to to the nearest store. A couple of reviews have noted that the binoculars do not have lens caps for the objective lenses. While this is a drawback, it is easily corrected. The lens casing is threaded, so buy a pair of 58mm UV filters and screw them in. … The UV filters will protect the lenses and any snap-on lens cover will attach to the UV filters.

Timothy B. Riley says:

Great, But Not My Favorite Canon IS Binoculars I have been an avid birder watcher for several decades. I’ve owned most of the top-of -the-line European binoculars (Zeiss, Leica, etc.) over the years. I purchased the Canon 12×36 IS binocs over 2 1/2 years ago and I love them. However, thinking that more magnification would be better, I ordered the 18×50 IS pair a year later. I have since sold them and use mostly the Canon 12 power. Here are a few reasons why they were not right for me: 

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