Birds of the Carolinas Field Guide, Second Edition: Companion to Birds of the Carolinas Audio CDs

December 5, 2015 - Comment

Learn about and identify birds using Stan Tekiela’s state-by-state field guides. The full-page, color photos are incomparable and include insets of winter plumage, color morphs and more. Plus, with the easy-to-use format, you don’t need to know a bird’s name or classification in order to easily find it in the book. Using this field guide

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(as of June 24, 2017 6:24 pm EDT - Details)

Learn about and identify birds using Stan Tekiela’s state-by-state field guides. The full-page, color photos are incomparable and include insets of winter plumage, color morphs and more. Plus, with the easy-to-use format, you don’t need to know a bird’s name or classification in order to easily find it in the book. Using this field guide is a real pleasure. It’s a great way for anyone to learn about the birds in your state.

Product Features

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Comments

BirdWatchr says:

Beginner Bird Identification Made Easy Having just started bird watching as a hobby, I found the ‘Birds of the Carolinas Field Guide’ to be my most used birding book. While birding in North/South Carolina why thumb through a book of all North American birds? This book has the birds of the Carolinas sectioned by color making identification easier. The photos are clear with helpful text to help with identification.I also bought the companion CDs with the sounds of the birds as well. Though the CDs are great reference (and I will undoubtably use them more as I learn more about birds), this book is where I spend much of my time.

Debra Buggie says:

The Best! I have always been frustrated by bird books — either I can’t locate anything that resembles the feathered creature in front of me, or I identify the perfect match … only to discover that the bird I claim to have seen has never been spotted within a thousand miles of my locale.Stan Tekiela’s book takes care of everything:The title says it all! There’s no way you can foolishly identify the rare Didgerywhatsit, which nests only in the Rocky Mountains — if the bird isn’t found here in the Carolinas, it’s not within these pages;The photographs actually look just like the real, live birds (why haven’t others managed this??); andIt is organized by colour, so it is as easy to identify the relatively drab females as it is the showier males.We have had enormous fun with this little volume, and can’t recommend it too highly.

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